Fall is a busy time for tree squirrels as they comb their environment for food to store for the winter.  While they can be fun to watch, they can also be a real nuisance for bird feeders and the garden in general.  They feed on a variety of fruits, nuts, and other crops and plants, dig holes in garden soil or in turf, where they bury nuts, acorns, or other seeds. They can be a nuisance around structures by gnawing on telephone cables, chewing their way into wooden buildings, or invading attics. Tree squirrels carry certain diseases that are transmissible to people, and they are frequently infested with fleas and mites.

Learn more about coping with these furry rodents and try this “squirrel-proof” set up for your bird feeders.  And if you’re ready for a good laugh, check out this AMAZING project; the lengths people will go to keep pesky squirrels out of their bird-feeder is incredible!

2 thoughts on “Squirrels making you nutty?”

  1. I have had active squirrel wars since the fox squirrels moved in. The native gray squirrels are not a problem. All of my feeders are on shepherd’s hooks covered with a slinky or copper pipe with elbow. All of them have the cage around them. One is on springs which close the openings with more than a few oz of weight. One is a spinner with plexiglass top that spins if a squirrel jumps on it, dumping it on the ground. The suet feeder has a very deep upside-down bowl over it so that when a squirrel lands on it, it tips sideways and it can’t reach the suet. I have a super-soaker loaded at all times near. My most successful trick has been to blend pepper flakes in with sunflower seed. All mammals are bothered by the burn of capsaicin in pepper – mouth and paws. Birds are not bothered by it. That said, I am winning on the birdfeeders, but they stripped almost every single piece of fruit from my fruit trees before they were ripe. They still won the season.

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